Oct

20

2018

International Explore the Moon Night

Science Outreach

Location: Roof (9th floor) of UCLA's Mathematical Sciences Building
Time: 7PM

On the evening of October 20th, 2018 from 7-9PM (weather permitting) come take part in the FREE International Observe the Moon Night (IOTMN) event on the roof (9th floor) of UCLA’s Mathematical Sciences Building. Speak with experts on the Moon, observe the Moon, Mars, and other celestial goodies first-hand with our telescopes, check out Lunar dust recovered from Apollo Missions, and learn more about the Moon and space! For more information, visit http://planets.ucla.edu/outreach/iotmn2018/

Sep

30

2018

Prof. Hilke Schlichting

Kuiper Belt Objects

Location: Geology 3656
Time: 2:30PM

In 1930 a small “planet”, Pluto, was discovered that had a strange orbit. The mean radius of the orbit was larger than that of Neptune, but during part of the orbit (e.g., 1979-1999) the object is closer to the Sun than Neptune. Thanks to research led by our UCLA colleague Dave Jewitt, additional “planets” with strange orbits occupying the region 30 to 50 AU from the Sun have been found. The objects largely consist of ices of water, methane and ammonia. Prof. Schlichting will talk about the formation of Kuiper-Belt objects, dynamical processes that caused their distribution in space, and relationships to comets. Picture credit: NASA

Aug

26

2018

Dr. Candace Kohl

Collection of Meteorites from Antarctic Ice Fields

Location: Geology 3656
Time: 2:30PM

Many very important meteorites have been collected from the “cold storage” of the Antarctic ice sheet. This continent-wide glacier is gradually moving towards the ocean; in some areas erosion by winds exposes meteorites on the surface. Candace will tell us about her experiences as a member of a collection team in Antarctica and also about participation on a team that collected a long core of Greenland ice to analyze for variations in cosmic-ray produced isotopes.

Jul

15

2018

Jean Pierre Williams

Mysterious Cold Spots on the Moon: A New Class of Impact Craters

Location: Geology 3656
Time: 2:30PM

Mapping by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter revealed areas having unusually low temperatures called “cold spots”; regions associated with recently formed impact craters. The cold spots identify the recently formed impact craters. Studying them improves our ability to use impact chronology to date planetary surfaces. The larger cold spot craters are candidate source craters for lunar meteorites; their formation ages are a few hundred thousand to a million years, similar to ejection ages of most lunar meteorites.

Jun

10

2018

Dr. Paul Warren and Prof. John Wasson

Ureilites, diamonds and meteorites from bodies the size of Mercury

Location: Geology 3656
Time: 2:30PM

They will discuss and critique a recent Nature article about diamonds found in a ureilite that fell in the Sudan in 2008. Although the diamonds are relatively small, it is inferred that they originally reached sizes of 100 micrometers; they contain some tiny Fe3(P,S) minerals which have compositions that require pressures only obtained at a depth of >2000 km in a planet the size of Mercury or Mars. These would be the first confirmed evidence of such high static pressures in meteorites. Picture: A colorized scanning transmission electron microscope image showing diamond (blue), inclusions (yellow), and graphite in the Almahata Sitta meteorite. (F. Nabiei, E. Oveisi, C. Hébert/EPFL, Switzerland)