Feb

24

2019

Fernando Ramirez

The Rediscovery of the Old Woman Meteorite Site

Location: Geology 3656
Time: 2:30PM

In 1976, two young prospectors discovered the second largest North American meteorite, the 3-ton Old Woman iron (a large slab cut from the iron is exhibited on the north wall of the UCLA Meteorite Gallery). This discovery triggered a bureaucratic struggle for ownership and the find site was never properly documented. Ramirez will tell stories about searching for and finally finding the fall site as well as his continuing efforts to detect the impact site higher up on the mountain.

Jan

20

2019

Ky Hughson

The Dawn Spacecraft at Ceres, the Largest Asteroid

Location: Geology 3656
Time: 2:30PM

Ceres has the largest water content among large asteroids. After orbiting asteroid Vesta for 14 months, the Dawn spacecraft used its solar-electric propulsion system to move to Ceres and orbit it. During three years at Ceres, Dawn observed anomalous ammonium, vexatious volcanoes, wandering water ice, freaky flows, effervescent evaporites, capricious carbon, and many more peculiarities. Ceres’ properties suggest that it is an evolved CM chondrite.

Jan

2

2019

Gallery open again

Holiday Closure (December 22nd through January 1st)

Location: UCLA Meteorite Gallery
Time: 9AM

The Meteorite Gallery will be closed for the Holidays from Saturday, December 22nd through Tuesday, January 1st. We will be open to the public again on Wednesday, January 2, 2019!

Dec

22

2018

Happy Holidays

Holiday closure

Location: UCLA Meteorite Gallery
Time: 9AM

The Meteorite Gallery will be closed for the Holidays from Saturday, December 22nd through Tuesday, January 1st. Happy Holidays to everyone and a Happy New Year!

Dec

2

2018

Dr. Aaron Celestian

Minerals, Microbes, and Mars

Location: Geology 3656
Time: 2:30PM

Celestian collaborates with JPL scientists in a search for signs of ancient life preserved in minerals on Earth. Using non-destructive analytical methods, they measure biosignatures (like beta-carotene) in crystals that are thousands or even millions of years old. Their findings will help assess data from NASA missions to Mars and the icy moons of Saturn and Jupiter, places that may harbor life.