Jun

9

2019

Dr. David Mittlefehldt

The History of Asteroids, Written in Stone

Location: Slichter Room 3853
Time: 2:30PM

Our next Gallery Lecture will be presented by Dr. David (“Duck”) Mittlefehldt from the Johnson Spacecraft Center in Houston. Duck is our former student. Achondrites – a subset of stony meteorites – were formed by processes familiar to any terrestrial geologist: melting to form magmas, separation from their sources, and crystallization upon cooling. There are a number of achondrite groups; each from a different asteroid; each with its own story to tell of the geology of its parent asteroid. In this talk, he will discuss the mineralogy, texture, and chemistry of several achondrite groups, and describe how they inform us of the earliest phases of the geologic history of asteroids.

May

27

2019

Closed for Memorial Day

Meteorite Gallery

Location: Geology 3697
Time: 9AM

In observance of Memorial Day, the Meteorite Gallery will be closed this Monday, May 27th. We will still follow regular hours on Sunday, May 26th.

May

18

2019

UCLA 2019 Alumni Day

Explore your Universe!

Location: Geology 3697
Time: 11AM

The Meteorite Gallery will be open from 11 p.m. – 4 p.m. with a docent to celebrate UCLA’s 2019 Alumni Day! We will stay open until 5 p.m. for those interested in a self- guided tour.

May

12

2019

Dr. Ashwin Vasavada

Curiosity Rover, Gale Crater and evidence of flowing water on Mars

Location: Geology 3656
Time: 2:30PM

Our next Gallery Lecture will be presented on 12 May 2019 by Dr. Ashwin Vasavada of JPL, Project Scientist for the Curiosity Mars Rover. His title is “Curiosity Rover, Gale Crater and evidence of flowing water on Mars.” Nearly seven years after its dramatic arrival at Mars, the Curiosity Rover continues to reveal Mars as a once-habitable planet. Streams and lakes persisted there for millions of years and created landforms that Curiosity explores within Gale crater. While the water has long since disappeared, shifting sands and seasonal cycles of methane gas reveal a dynamic planet today. This talk will cover the latest findings from the mission, some striking images, the challenges of exploration, and what lies ahead. Photo Credit: NASA

Apr

7

2019

Dr. Dimitri Papanastassiou

Apollo Science Recollection

Location: Geology 3656
Time: 2:30PM

Our next Gallery Lecture will be presented on Sunday, 7 Apr 2019 by Dr. Dimitri Papanastassiou, an expert in isotopic geochronology, recently retired from JPL. The Apollo Program was a competitive race to the Moon. Science was inserted quite late. But, once inserted, it resulted in a revolution in planetary science, in the development of a wide range of new analytical techniques and of new ways to think about planetary evolution, including the Earth. Funding for planetary science became plentiful for a few years; it allowed the formation of multidisciplinary teams. "I was finishing my Ph.D. in Physics when the Apollo 11 samples came back and had the excitement to work on them starting in September of 1969. I had developed a mass spectrometer uniquely capable of measuring lunar samples. I attended the 1st Lunar Science Conference, on a very cold day (Jan. 5, 1970) as a newly-minted Ph. D. and continued to work on samples from every Apollo mission. I will share the excitement and serendipity, as well as the importance of the multidisciplinary approach (physics, chemistry, geology)."