Nov

16

2014

Meteorite Gallery and other venues

Exploring Your Universe (a Science Open House).

Location: Slichter 3853
Time: 12PM

Instead of a talk on meteorites this month the Gallery is taking part in the outreach event Exploring Your Universe (EYU) from 12 till 5. The event is mainly focused on research in Planetary Science and Astrophysics. There are numerous exhibits and demonstrations and also wide ranging lecture topics occurring throughout the afternoon. Visit the EYU website.

Oct

26

2014

Peter Utas

Discovery and recovery of meteorites from the California Deserts.

Location: Slichter 3853
Time: 2:30PM

This lecture will discuss which terrains are best suited for hunting meteorites, give examples of recoveries, and briefly illustrate the tracks made by meteorites that have moved across the surface of dry lakes.

Sep

28

2014

Paul Warren

Major Messages of Moon Meteorites

Location: Slichter 3853
Time: 2:30PM

This lecture will briefly cover how we recognize lunar meteorites, what they add to our knowledge of the Moon, and why for many purposes the Apollo lunar samples are still supremely important. This lecture will briefly cover how we recognize lunar meteorites, what they add to our knowledge of the Moon, and why for many purposes the Apollo lunar samples are still supremely important.

Aug

24

2014

Frank Kyte

The most meteorite-rich place on Earth...

Location: Slichter 3853
Time: 2:30PM

Where is it? Unfortunately in one of the most poorly explored places on earth, and on the bottom of the ocean too. But 2.5 million years ago an asteroid deposited more than one kilogram per square meter of meteorite over thousands of square kilometers of the ocean floor near Antarctica.

Jul

20

2014

Kevin McKeegan

Meteorites too small to see: collecting micrometeorites and comet dust

Location: Slichter 3853
Time: 2:30PM

Almost all of the meteorites on display in museums are pebble-sized or larger rocks that come from asteroids. However, most of the extraterrestrial matter coming to the Earth every day is in the form of microscopic cosmic dust, which includes both samples of asteroids and of comets. For decades, NASA has collected this dust high in the Earth's atmosphere using re-purposed U2 spy planes and in 2004 has also collected bonafide comet dust by flying the Stardust spacecraft through the tail of Jupiter-family comet P/Wild2 and returning the sample to the Earth for detailed study. I will discuss these collections, what the cosmic dust looks like, and how its properties compare to those of meteorites.