Exhibit 2: Camp Wood and Gibeon Iron

This 148 kg (326 pound) Camp Wood meteorite is a IIIAB magmatic iron meteorite formed by fractional crystallization in the molten core of an asteroid. Compared to most IIIAB irons, its composition implies that it formed from a moderate amount of trapped melt. It is an octahedrite with bands of low-Ni metal that are typical of IIIAB irons.

The Camp Wood iron was first recognized by a hunter in Texas around 1968 who left it on his front porch until it was sold to the Utas family in 2007. The specimen is on a long-term loan from the Utas Meteorite Collection to the UCLA Meteorite Gallery.

This 368 kg (811 pound) Gibeon meteorite is a IVA magmatic iron meteorite that formed by fractional crystallization in the molten core of an asteroid. It is a fine octahedrite with parallel bands of low-ni metal about 0.3 mm thick. A polished and etched slab of Gibeon is displayed in Cabinet 6.

Gibeon has the second largest total mass among collected iron meteorites, probably in excess of 70 tons. The specimen is on a long-term loan from the Utas Meteorite Collection to the UCLA Meteorite Gallery.